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 #   Notes   Linked to 
1  Rita (I495)
 
2  DENT, Dorothy M. (I523)
 
3 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I610)
 
4 (1894 on headstone) BATTISTA, Maria "Mary" (I147)
 
5 22, “labourer” JORDAN, William (I267)
 
6 ? aged 50; book keeper FARNES, Anthony (I364)
 
7 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I646)
 
8 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I320)
 
9 A note on the back of a picture of her says "Bridget Collins, wife of Matthew Jordan, died in 1879, she's from Chicago, he came from Waterford, Ireland (Portlaw County), an arranged marriage."

Her nephew was Jimmy Collins of the Boston Red Sox. 
COLLINS, Mary "Bridget" (I266)
 
10 A number of Caldieros immigrate through Ellis Island, but none are named Alphonse. Instead, the only Alphonses close to this name who came through were named Caldieri. It might be a transcription error, but it’s an error by different scribes on different manifests over a number of years.

The 1930 census says that he immigrated in 1892, which must be the first date of immigration. There isn’t a reason to doubt this, but I can’t find a record of a trip then.

The first migration record that matches his age is in 1901, aboard the S.S. Patria, arriving in NYC from Naples on 25 June 1901. He was 18, and Alphonse would have turned 19 that year. He was unmarried, but was from S. Valentino. He also has a relation listed, a “Pasquale” Caldieri.

Nana (Theresa), his grand-daughter, says that he had first immigrated when he was 18 (so, abt. 1900) with a wife and three children; this would match. The wife and two children, twins, died (apparently in childbirth); the third died soon after—he always said from grief. He then returned to Italy to find another wife. When he did, though, he was drafted into the Italian army for WWI.

In 1907, Alphonse Caldiero, arriving from Naples aboard the Neckar on 1 June, is from S. Valentino and traveling to Buffalo. He says that his brother Pasquale lives there. (There is another record of an Alfonso Caldiero arriving on the Roma from Naples on 21 April 1907, but this entry is lined out, with no data, so perhaps this is an error.)

In 1912, Alphonzo Caldieri and his wife Carmela Alaria arrived from Naples aboard the S.S. Berlin on 22 March. This matches the 1920 census, which says that he and his wife Carmela immigrated in 1912 (though, this 1920 Carmela would be Carmela Custodi). They were from S. Valentino in Salerno. They list a close relation. Alphonse’s father in San Valentino is “Carmine.” The second page of the manifest says that they are traveling to Buffalo, and the relation they are traveling to there is his brother Pasquale at 278 Seneca St.

“Caldiero” is a town in nothern Italy. It has the historical distinction of being conquered by Napoleon (the Battle of Caldiero was on Nov. 11, 1796), and having the town’s name engraved on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. 
CALDIERO, Alphonse (I149)
 
11 A State Trooper in New York, one of the very first. McMULLEN, Clark (I411)
 
12 according to 1880 census FRIES, Charles (I360)
 
13 according to 1880 census BORGER, Gertrude (I539)
 
14 according to 1900 census VALIQUETTE, Peter (I84)
 
15 according to 1900 census Mary (I261)
 
16 according to 1900 census CLARK, Anna (I394)
 
17 according to 1900 census CLARK, James (I423)
 
18 according to 1910 census CLARK, Michael (I506)
 
19 according to 1910 census Family F392
 
20 According to 1920 census BATTISTA, Angelo Domenico (I162)
 
21 According to 1920 census BATTISTA, Angelo Domenico (I162)
 
22 according to 1925 NY State census PALERMO, Carmine (I647)
 
23 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I648)
 
24 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I361)
 
25 according to 1930 census Family F252
 
26 according to death certificate VALIQUETTE, Moses William (I351)
 
27 According to family documents he was a Buffalo Police detective. JORDAN, Joseph (I287)
 
28 According to family history documents, she was a teacher in P.S. 4 in South Buffalo; her husband Mr. Hinman was the principal. JORDAN, Mary E. "Aunt Mayme" (I456)
 
29 According to family history she married a Mr. Clare of Mt. Pleasant, MI, "a large family of farmers.” With this information, she can be matched to Francis Clare on Ancestry.com’s “oneworldtree,” which though it includes no source data, has been a place to start. RAMÉ, Mary Sophia Louisa "Sophia" (I362)
 
30 according to gravestone CALDIERO, Pasquale (I639)
 
31 According to her birth record from Allegheny Co., PA (Pittsburgh), her parents were Ann and Thomas; she was born in 28 May 1887, on Carson St. in the 34th Ward; and her father was a "puddler," working in a mill.

Everyone says that she lived in Altoona (Blair Co, Pennsylvania) when she was young. Maybe the family went to Pittsburgh for the birth, or moved there afterwards. Both her siblings William and Jack/John stayed in Altoona.

In 1900, Anna Tobin, aged 12 (born June 1887) is living with her grandmother Mary Tobin--this is her grandmother. Could she have been counted twice?

I can't find this family on the 1910 census. 
TOBIN, Katherine "Anna" (I14)
 
32 According to his death certificate, he was born Oct. 11, 1818 in Portlaw, in the south of Ireland. His precise date of immigration is not known, but he must have been here by 1843 when he applied for citizenship.

In the 1870 census he is living with wife Bridget (42), with children Mary H, Catharine, Joseph, William, Richard, Johanna, Margaret, Perry, James, Ellen, and Henry (who is 10 mos.)

Note the differences between this and a decade later. In the 1880 census, he is living at 713 Elk St. with his wife Bridget and children Mary E, Catharine, William, Perris [sic], James, Alice, Mary (daughter-in-law), and Matthew (10 mos., ____ nephew). This last must be Mary Moran, living with her husband William, and their first born son Matthew, aged 10/12. 
JORDAN, Matthew (I265)
 
33 according to marriage record, where he is about 24 CLERC, Cesar (I575)
 
34 According to the 1860 census, their son Lawrence, aged 12, was born in Ireland, but their daughter Catherine, age 8, was born in New York; this gives a window between 1848 and 1852 when they must have emigrated. This makes it likely that this family left Ireland to avoid the potato famine, which struck in the late 1840s.

See, possibly, in the six volumes on The Famine Immigrants, ed. Ira Glazer and Michael Tepper. 
McCORMICK, Philip (I164)
 
35 According to the 1860 census, their son Lawrence, aged 12, was born in Ireland, but their daughter Catherine, age 8, was born in New York; this gives a window between 1848 and 1852 when they must have emigrated. This makes it likely that this family left Ireland to avoid the potato famine, which struck in the late 1840s.

See, possibly, in the six volumes on The Famine Immigrants, ed. Ira Glazer and Michael Tepper. 
DUHANEY, Honora (I247)
 
36 According to the 1880 census, both of his parents were born in Bavaria. FRIES, Charles (I316)
 
37 According to the 1900 census CLARK, James (I293)
 
38 According to the 1900 census, both of her parents were born in Ireland.

In 1860, a full picture of her family appears, with her parents Philip and Honora, and 4 siblings.

In 1870, however, she is living with two other people: Michael Moran, his wife Catharine (who I assume is Mary’s older sister by her age), and Lawrence her older brother. It would seem that her parents had died between 1860 and 1870, leaving the children to fend for themselves. This household must be the reason why she is also known as Mary Moran.

In 1880, she is living with her husband William, aged 22. 
McCORMICK, Mary (I282)
 
39 According to the 1900 census, he immigrated in 1860. More likely this happened earlier, however, since the 1865 NYState census says that all of his children, including the oldest, were born in New York state. So, he seems to have immigrated by 1855.

He appears in Wheatland Twp. in the 1865 NYState census, aged 50. He and his wife Catherine (no maiden named mentioned) were born in Ireland, and James is marked as Naturalized. All of their children are listed as born in Monroe County, including daughter “Ann J.” (Honora), aged 10. Other children in the household are Thomas (8), Bridget (6), Maria (4), James (3) and Peter (1).

He does not seem to appear in the 1860 US census in New York State.

He was, it is said, a “builder of bridges during the Civil War.” There was a James Clark who served in the 50th New York Engineers, originally organized at Elmira; this one had a middle initial "C." There was a James C. Clark living in Genesee county in the 1860 census, married to Augusta Clark, but I don't think this is the same one.

The censuses in 1870 and 1880 again place this family in Wheatland, which is a bit west of their Post Office in Scottsville, New York, in Monroe County south of Rochester. Pictures of this family show Oatka Creek, on which folks used to go boating, with a paper mill and a blacksmith shop identified next to the creek. Oatka Creek is now a public park near Scottsville. I assume the park was near the house, and available close by for family outings. It was possible for boats to transit from the Genesee Valley Canal to the Creek at one point via a lock.

In 1905, in the NYState census, he was living on Main Street in Wheatland with his son James, a butcher, and daughter Anna, doing housework. 
CLARK, James (I293)
 
40 According to the 1910 and 1920 censuses, her father and mother were both from Ireland, though she was born in New York State. CLARK, Jane Honora "Jenny" (I85)
 
41 According to the 1930 census, his father was born in Pennsylvania, and his mother in New York.

There is a possible Edward Flanigan who is his father on the 1910 census: Edward Flanigan, aged 19, is living with his father Edward Flanigan (aged 45, born in Canada, and both his parents born in Ireland) and his mother Julia (aged 44, born in Pennsylvania, like her mother, though her father was born in Canada). He is the second child, with older sister Gertrude (21), and younger siblings Edward, Ethel, George, Eleanor, Michael, Joseph, Charles. In the 1st Ward, Enum. Dist. 17, Erie City, Erie County, Pennsylvania.

The reason that I think the entry on the 1930 census matches this family is because Mary Tobin (aged 48), the sister-in-law to the HOH Edward Flanigan, is also living in the household. 
FLANIGAN, Edward (I325)
 
42 according to the attached autopsy report BISANTZ, Dominic (I216)
 
43 according to the city directory VALIQUETTE, James (I414)
 
44 according to the gravestone Mary (I261)
 
45 Age 30; It’s just him and his mother living together. FRIES, Oscar (I312)
 
46 age 36 Florence S. (I334)
 
47 age 37, born in Italy, mother tongue is Italian; “car repairer” for the Steam R.R. PALERMO, Epifanio "Anthony" (I179)
 
48 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I331)
 
49 age 51, born in New York (in June 1848); both parents born in Germany. Widow. Living on 690 Michigan St. RAMÉ, Margaret Victoria (I310)
 
50 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I333)
 

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